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  • Best Way to Fold Fitted Sheets

    Finally, we have learned the perfect way to fold fitted sheets. Share this with everyone who are still struggling to fold their fitted sheets perfectly.

    Video Credit: Terri Metz Youtube channel, titled "Oh Sheet! It’s just that easy #toodaloo"

    Photo Credit: Dmitry Arslanov, Unsplash.com 

    Follow us at TheSelene.com/blogs/news for more fun, entertaining and informative articles on women. 

  • Brides Wearing Their Grandmothers' Gowns

    We are in love with this idea and hoping to see it becoming a trend, not only because we love everything vintage, but also we love the idea of reclaiming older beautiful things, and honoring our loved ones. 

    This is the story of two brides who decided to reclaim and wear their grandmathers' gowns in their own weddings. 

    Madison Kantzer's grandmother, Adel Schiff Greene, died in 1969 when Madison’s mother was just 14 years old. Although Madison never had the chance to meet her, she always admired the floor-length, beaded gown that once belonged to her grandmother. 

    When Madison said yes to her fiance Adam Hoffman, she knew she was going to wear the beautiful gown her grandmother wore at her son's bar mitzvah (Madison's uncle) in 1966 as the wedding gown for herself. 

    In the story, published in Today.com, Madison says she wished it was her grandmother's original wedding dress, but the family did not have that gown. However, she loved the gorgeous dress her mother kept 30 years, and knew this was the perfect dress for her to wear in her special day.

    Here is the original story with the photos of the couple and the dress.

    Idaho bride, Jordyn Cleverly, had tried many gowns to find her dream dress for her wedding, but she says none of them made her feel like a woman. When she was able to find a seamstress willing to take on the months-long job of restoring and modernizing her grandmother’s 1962 long-sleeve, lace wedding gown, everything fell into place.

    The dress almost ended up in a donation bin when Jordyn's grandmother, Penny Jensen, 74, called her son (Jordyn's father) and asked if he would like to keep it, otherwise she was planning of donating it to the Salvation Army. Luckily, Jordyn's father wanted to keep it.

    Jordyn kept the idea of restoring and wearing the gown a secret from her grandmother, until two days before her wedding day in Boise, Idaho. She secretly left the rehearsal dinner and put on the gown to surprise Penny during the photo shoot. Needless to say, the photo shoot was emotional and tear-filled.

    Read the original story with the photos and a beautiful video of the special moment from this link

    If you like these stories, follow us at TheSelene.com, also Facebook: The Selene Organic Tampons and Pads

    Photo credit: Wedding Photography/Unsplash.com 
     

     

     

  • Med School Altered Test Results to Fail Women Students

    A Tokyo Medical University has changed the entrance exam results of women students since 2011, to keep the female student population low. The reason? Supposedly, women tend to quit as doctors after starting families, causing hospital staffing shortages, media reports said Thursday.

    On Friday night, dozens of people gathered outside the university to protest the unfair treatment. Some of the signs read, “Protest against sexist entrance exams!” and “You trampled on the efforts and lives of women who trusted and chose you.”

    Originally reported by the Yomiuri Shimbun newspaper, other Japanese media, including NHK and Kyodo News, also reported claims of exam manipulation.

    Tokyo Medical University

    Tokyo Medical University

    Yoshiko Maeda, head of the Japan Medical Women’s Association, said in a statement on the group’s Facebook page, “Instead of worrying about women quitting jobs, they should do more to create an environment where women can keep working. And we need working style reform, which is not just to prevent overwork deaths, but to create a workplace where everyone can perform to the best of their ability regardless of gender.”

    In Japan, women account for more than 40% of the overall workforce, but the share of female doctors has been stuck at about 30% for more than 20 years. The slow progress in the medical field has prompted speculation among some doctors about possible widespread interference in the school admissions process.

    Many female graduates face discrimination in hiring and pay in Japan. Lack of support in child-rearing together with long working hours often force them to give up their careers. As ages and birth rates remain low in Japan, many workplaces including hospitals are chronically short-staffed.

    Image: The Expat's Guide to Japan

    Photo credit: Piron Guillaume

     

     

  • Tampon Safety Bill that Never Passed

    Before we all get excited, the bill to require tampon manufacturers to be independently tested did not pass. It was introduced by New York Rep. Carolyn B. Maloney to the Congress nine times, beginning in 1997. Unfortunately, it was stopped each time it came near to a vote. 

    The Bill's name was changed to 'Robin Danielson Feminine Hygiene Product Safety Act' after Robin's death from Toxic Shock Syndrome in 1998, a year after the first bill was introduced.

    FDA, the agency that is responsible from our health, does not require tampon manufacturers to be tested by independent testing organizations. There are no independent research that investigated the potential health impacts of long-term feminine hygiene product use. Any studies that have taken place was done through product manufacturers. Yes, you read this right, basically the industry regulates itself. Isn't it convenient? Oh, by the way, they aren't even required to release the results in full to the public. FDA does not require these manufacturers to disclose their ingredients either.

    When interviewed by the Rewire Magazine about the Bill, Mrs. Maloney said, “We need more dedicated and substantial research to address unanswered health concerns regarding the safety of feminine hygiene products. American women spend well over $2 billion per year on feminine hygiene products, and the average woman will use over 16,800 tampons and pads over the course of her lifetime. Despite this large investment and high usage, there has been limited research on the potential health risks these products may pose to women.”

    The bill would have required the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to allocate resources for independent research into the potential hazards posed by synthetic fibers and chemicals currently present in many of the feminine hygiene products on the market. It would also mandate research to confirm data submitted to the FDA by manufacturers. The results of all future independent studies would be submitted to Congress, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Consumer Product Safety Commission as well as the FDA. These findings would also be available to the public.[1]

    As we have reported before, there is research indicating that chemicals in the personal care products do disrupt hormones in teen girls. EPA claims that these chemicals are too small amount to harm our bodies, but the research shows otherwise. 

    This is one of many reasons we have decided to only sell all organic feminine hygiene products, and work with manufacturers that disclose all their ingredients. Aside from our health concerns, we had concerns about how the products were manufactured and disposed. All of our products are biodegradable, not tested on animals and ethically sourced. So, when you buy from us, you are not only purchasing products that are clearly safer and better for your health, but also not harming animals and our planet. Visit our website to learn more: The Selene

    Source: ‘Robin Danielson Act’ Would Mandate Independent Testing on Tampon Safety- Review Magazine

    Photo Credit: Johnny McClung